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Fresh Voices take over Roundhouse Radio for an awards special

In the run-up to the 2016 Fresh Voices Awards, our Youth Advisory Team and adult allies teamed up with the amazing Abeer (Producer) and ‘Sense of Place’ host Minelle Mahtani at Vancouver’s Roundhouse Radio to create a week-long series of shows!

Throughout the week, listeners were given an insight into the perspectives of youth refugees and migrants to BC. Following the awards night, we took to the airwaves one last time to highlight some of our amazing award recipients!

Day 1: An introduction to the Fresh Voices initiative and the value of recognizing youth leaders in immigrant and refugee communities.

Day 2: In conversation with previous Fresh Voices Awards winner Sajedeh and Elfred Matining from Arts Starts.

Day 3: The experiences of youth working with adult allies, featuring Mark Gifford and Kris Archie from Vancouver Foundation, and Youth Advisory Team member Reyna Villasin.

Day 4: Talking about building strong networks of immigrant youth to support each other, featuring Vi Nguyen from Vancouver Foundation and Youth Advisory Team members.

Day 5: Sharing experiences of youth support with Lily Grewal from Vancity Community Foundation, Peter Fleigel from  Michaëlle Jean Foundation, and Jorge Salazar from Vancouver Foundation.

Day 6: Announcing our 2016 Fresh Voices award recipients, joined on air by some of the recipients themselves! Listen again: http://cirh.streamon.fm/listen-pl-6625

About the awards

The Fresh Voices Awards recognize the inspiration and leadership of immigrant and refugee youth in British Columbia and across Canada, working to advance social change based on themes and priorities including Immigration, School and English Language Learning, Family, Building Bridges and Working in Solidarity.

The awards were announced on December 5th at the Terminal City Club in Vancouver. More details about the award recipients will be published on this website soon.

Did you know?

10 years after arriving in Canada, immigrants still face poverty rates twice as high as Canadian-born people. It takes 20 years for the poverty rates of immigrants to equalize with the poverty rates of persons born in Canada.

See more facts